Tag Archives: children

Save Hide And Seek For The Playground: Why Kids Should See Their Veggies

When my daughter turned 1, a routine toe prick revealed that her iron levels were low. Because our family doesn’t eat much iron-rich red meat, the pediatrician advised that we feed our daughter spinach. Every. Single. Day. This was bad. My daughter had just entered a picky eating phase and leafy greens were “yuck.”

Things were going poorly until I made popsicles. These frozen treats were chock full of blended spinach, peanut butter, yogurt, carrots, other miscellaneous healthy stuff, and blueberries, which conveniently turned the entire concoction purple. My daughter devoured the pops.

Yes! Parenting win!

Hmm, says Gillian Harris, among the world’s foremost experts on picky eating in children and a consultant and clinical psychologist at the University of Birmingham in the UK, when I describe my pops to her over the phone. “You want the child to look at the vegetable, taste the vegetable, get used to the vegetable and eat that vegetable when they’re 7 or 8,” she says.

In other words, getting your kid to eat veggies through subterfuge — whether via awesome pops or in those now ubiquitous pouches that let children squeeze a mix of fruits and kale/carrot/parsnip/other vegetable into their mouths through a makeshift straw sets the bar too low. Your child must actually learn to like veggies, weird textures and all.

With research showing that low vegetable consumption early in life tracks to low consumption later, and with poor diet correlated with a host of diseases later in life, including weight problems, cardiovascular disease and cancer, getting kids to eat unadulterated veggies has far-reaching public health implications. Yet research suggests that a whopping 93 percent of U.S. children between the ages of 1 and 18 do not meet current recommendations for vegetable intake.

To continue reading the article from NPR, click here.

Osteoporosis: Nutrition and Children


When you hear osteoporosis, you often think of aging adults and their bone health. “Osteoporosis is a major cause of morbidity and economic burden around the world. By the year 2020, it is estimated that half of Americans 50 years of age or older will be at risk for osteoporotic fractures,” according to researchers from the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Osteoporosis Quick Facts:

  • Osteoporosis causes more than 8.9 million fractures annually (that’s a fracture every 3 seconds)
  • It is estimated that osteoporosis affects 75 million people in Europe, USA and Japan
  • By 2025, the estimated number of hip fractures occurring worldwide in men will be similar to that observed in women in 1990
  • Smoking can lead to a lower bone density and a higher risk of fracture
  • Childhood and adolescence are particularly valuable times to improve bone mass through exercise

The foundation for this condition is rooted in childhood and adolescence, when preventative measures can be taken.

Nutrition in Childhood

The primary source of nutrition for infants should be human milk (or instant formula, if human milk is not attainable). After this stage of life, dietary calcium comes from milk and other dairy products, which will account for 70-80% of calcium intake.

“Based on their report, the researchers recommend that pediatricians advise children and adolescents to increase daily consumption of calcium and foods and beverages containing vitamin D, which includes nonfat milk and low-fat yogurts” (Medical News Today).

Medical News Today also says that, “as part of their report, they say routine calcium supplementation is not advised for healthy children but that increased dietary intake is strongly encouraged.

To learn more about milk and it’s alternatives, here is a helpful article.

Sources:

Medical News Today — http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/283174.php?sr

International Osteoporosis Foundation — https://www.iofbonehealth.org/facts-statistics#category-23

Corn, milk proteins make medicine easier to swallow


Developing medications for children can be challenging — taste and texture are important, but safety is also a major concern, according to pharmaceutical sciences professor Om Perumal at South Dakota State University. As co-founder and chief scientific officer of Tranzderm Solutions, he is adapting his corn protein-based drug delivery method to oral pediatric formulations.

“Our core technology is the same, but we’ve refined it and are finding new ways to utilize it,” said Perumal. His patented drug delivery system uses zein, a protein found in dried distillers grain, a co-product of ethanol production, to encapsulate the medication. The nanoparticles are approximately 500 times smaller than the diameter of a human hair.

To apply to oral pediatric formulations, Perumal explained, “We’ve modified the nanoparticles by coating them with milk proteins.” explained Perumal. “Our idea is to use products kids like.”

Providing federal incentive

Before 1998, about 70 percent of the drugs used for children had not undergone clinical testing for the newborn to 17-year-old population, according to the National Institutes of Health Medline Plus.

“Drugs behave differently in children than adults,” Perumal explained. However, the pharmaceutical industry did not have much incentive to do the testing because the pediatric medications make up only 10 percent of the pharmaceutical market.

To encourage the development of drugs customized for children, the federal government in 2002 passed the Best Pharmaceutical for Children’s Act. It grants incentives to drug companies conducting Food and Drug Administration-requested pediatric studies.

Read More at Science Daily